Cage / Pale Little Spider Review(s)

Cage

Cage

The MAX line of comics is an imprint of Marvel Comics started in 2001 after Marvel broke away from the Comics Code and established its own rating system. This gave them the opportunity to publish R-rated or uncensored material. Opportunity is the key word here. Censorship has no place in creating art. When crafting a story, the author should never have to ask themselves if they are allowed to do so or not: if the story is coming from a real place of genuine storytelling, then it should just… be.

Cage and Pale Little Spider take two different approaches to this freedom. Cage uses it to tell a story it couldn’t before, while Pale Little Spider seems to think adding adult content is its obligation.

That’s the big difference between the two. Cage is a story without restrictions, while Pale Little Spider is a child that thinks cursing and nudity is mature.

In Cage, Brian Azzerello uses his freedom to tell a hardcore, realist tale of life on the streets and one man that tries to make a difference. The adult content is sparse and used mostly for atmosphere.

In Pale Little Spider, a new Black Widow created by Greg Rucka infiltrates a fetish brothel because her commanding officer paid someone to dress as her for his pleasure, then killed him.

If opportunity is another word for failure, then these two are synonymous.

CageCage by Brian Azzarello

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

“In Cage, Brian Azerello uses his freedom to tell a hardcore, realist tale of life on the streets and one man that tries to make a difference. The adult content is sparse and used mostly for atmosphere.”

View all my reviews

Black Widow: Pale Little SpiderBlack Widow: Pale Little Spider by Greg Rucka

My rating: 1 of 5 stars

“In Pale Little Spider, a new Black Widow created by Greg Rucka infiltrates a fetish brothel because her commanding officer paid someone to dress as her for his pleasure, then killed him.”

View all my reviews

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One response to “Cage / Pale Little Spider Review(s)

  1. Pingback: X-Men: Of Faith and Fable; & X-Force Annual #3 review | The Book Closet·

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